Rolling whiskey barrels and lots of fun: Northern Highland Games in Selmsdorf

Selmsdorf.Saturday morning at the sports ground in Selmsdorf: Men in kilts live in the parking lot. On this warm, sunny day, Scottish fans and recreational athletes from all over Germany come together here for the North Upland Games.

Read more after the ad

Read more after the ad

Strong Men: “Sons of Odin”

“Northmen – Sons of Odin” can be read on the t-shirts of the men who flock behind the Mercedes van. “We are the defenders of the title,” says Martin Wustlich.

At the Northern Highland Games, the straw mattress is to be thrown as high as possible.

Read more after the ad

Read more after the ad

Like all “sons of Odin”, the 31-year-old from Lüdersdorf looks pretty strong. No wonder, because the “North” are members of the Herrnburg Athletics Association. This time they will face tough competition.

Nine teams are fighting for victory

The Teschower Jungs are taking part in the North Upland Games. Nine teams compete in the competition, demonstrating strength and skill in disciplines such as tree trunk throwing, stone throwing, whiskey barrel rolling, tree trunk slalom, straw bag throwing and weight throwing.

Quite exhausting: tree trunk slalom.

Quite exhausting: tree trunk slalom.

“It’s all fun,” says the competitor with Selmsdorfer Hauke ​​Pilz. This is Sylvana Bomholdt. In 2017, she became world champion at the Highland Games in Iceland. A year later, she repeated her success in Germany. Tomorrow, the 48-year-old from Flensburg will fly to Canada for the next World Cup.

A good community with numerous clans

He enjoys competition, meeting many clans and a good community. In Selmsdorf, he boasts: “The place here is very good.”

Read more after the ad

Read more after the ad

There is a large audience on the edge and stalls from Selmsdorf clubs offering food and drinks. Andrew Helfert came all the way from Bavaria. Born in Scotland, he offers kilts and original Scottish accessories.

The competition is led by the two-time world champion Sylvana Bomholdt (48).

The competition is led by the two-time world champion Sylvana Bomholdt (48).

Next to him is another man with a kilt: Udo Grobe. The 66-year-old belongs to the German Clan MacKenzie Association. It hosts the Northern Highland Games with the community and clubs. Representatives of the MacGregor, MacLeod, MacFarlane and Campbell clans are also present.

Selmsdorfer is a fan of Scotland

Hauke ​​Pilz has been involved with the Clan MacKenzie Association in Germany for many years. Scottish fans brought the Highland Games to Mecklenburg. Competition is unique at MV.

Read more after the ad

Read more after the ad

“We are keeping the tradition alive and bringing Scottish culture to Germany,” says Hajo Petersen (63), president of the MacKenzie Clan Association in Germany.

Hajo Petersen has been president of the Clan MacKenzie Association in Germany for ten years. At the edge of the sports ground in Selmsdorf, the 63-year-old explains what the community is: “We are keeping the tradition alive and bringing Scottish culture to Germany.” Members live in an area that stretches from Munich to Flensburg and Leipzig up to the limit of the Netherlands.

“You just have to mark Scottish”

Their president explains: “We started as a group six, twelve years ago. We are now 140 years old. ” What does it take to become a member of the Society? Hajo Petersen smiles as he replies, “You just have to think in Scottish terms.”

Hamburg Caledonian Pipes and Drums at the opening of the Northern Highland Games.

Hamburg Caledonian Pipes and Drums at the opening of the Northern Highland Games.

Herald Hoffmann definitely does. The 61-year-old from Bad Oldesloe takes the lead in Scottish attire as the musicians step onto the pitch at the start of the Highland Games. The group “Hamburg Caledonian Pipes and Drums” plays probably the most famous Scottish song “Scotland, the Brave”.

Read more after the ad

Read more after the ad

A group of drums and pipes from Hamburg

Herald Hoffmann reveals what makes making music in a band like “Hamburg Caledonian Pipes and Drums” difficult: “You have to know all the songs by heart.” Music stands and stands would not suit a traditional Scottish music group at all.

Sebastian Anika (42) from Lübeck carries, if possible, two wooden blocks weighing 33 kilograms.

Sebastian Anika (42) from Lübeck carries, if possible, two wooden blocks weighing 33 kilograms.

After “Hamburg Caledonian Pipes and Drums” have played their last song for the time being, Hauke ​​Pilz welcomes the teams and spectators and wishes everyone a good time. Subsequently, Selmsdorf mayor Marcus Kreft issues the unofficial Northern Highland Olympic motto: “Everything is Scottish except the weather.”

Mayor wearing a kilt

Kreft thinks it is good that the competition is taking place in Selmsdorf. “It really is an honor for the community,” says the mayor. He is also not wearing pants, but a kilt.

Read more after the ad

Read more after the ad

Stefan Mecklenburg of Selmsdorf throws a load at the North Highland Games.

Stefan Mecklenburg of Selmsdorf throws a load at the North Highland Games.

On this glorious day in June, the sun is shining over the organizers of the Highland Games. Ladies and gentlemen are very pleased with the numerous guests, helpers and supporters and with the provision of space by the municipality of Selmsdorf.

The clan leaders chose their strong people

What are the Mountain Games about? For fun, of course. But not only. President Hajo Petersen says, “We are showing how the clan chiefs elected their strong men.”

Athletes and referees line up to say hello.

Athletes and referees line up to say hello.

Highland players need to be strong but also skilled. World champion Sylvana Bomholdt explains it with an example when she throws a tree trunk: “It doesn’t depend on distance. The trunk of the tree must fall over. Then the time is judged. ” It is optimal if the trunk lies exactly in a straight line on the ground, as seen from the thrower, i.e. at twelve o’clock, so to speak.

Read more after the ad

Read more after the ad

By Juergen Lenz

Leave a Comment