Shortage of skilled workers: a real academic mania – WELT

opinion skills shortage

A real academic mania

Manage apprentice vacancies with high school graduates?  In the end, everyone would lose, says WELT author Olaf Gersemann Manage apprentice vacancies with high school graduates?  In the end, everyone would lose, says WELT author Olaf Gersemann

Manage apprentice vacancies with high school graduates? In the end, everyone would lose, says WELT author Olaf Gersemann

Source: Christoph Hardt / Geisler-Fotopress; the image of the alliance; Klaudiusz Plow

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The term “academic mania” supposedly means demanding more educational diversity. Actually, it is about stopping the growing competition in the labor market. After all, everyone is poorer when we turn high school graduates into skilled workers.

Darrogant German scientists tend to express their arrogance in three steps: first, marries another scientist. This is when children are born who, secondly, are prepared for an academic career as naturally as at a young age.

Third, the German academician urgently advises other people’s children to take up a proper apprenticeship, baker, plumber, or something honest and down-to-earth. Blink, blink, not every offspring can be as gifted as self-produced.

At the higher ranks of politics and business in Germany, the academician built a monopoly position. In 1998, the percentage of academicians in the Bundestag exceeded 80%, and in the federal cabinet we are at 100%. According to appropriate estimates, British or Americans are now more common on the boards of 40 German DAX companies than non-academics.

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The academic elite talks about “diversity” all the time, just for the sake of educational diversity, please let others handle it, but really. What is then brought to the battlefield of “academic mania” has always been strongly suspected that it is, in fact, about keeping increasing competition in the labor market at bay.

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Artificial labor shortages in order to protect their own interests have a tradition in Germany that goes back to medieval guilds. The associated lobbying is not even blameworthy. It should only be attached.

It is now more urgent than ever. Because the training year has just started and 230,000 trainee positions are vacant. So there is no shortage of voices proclaiming that many more young women and men should be lured into double training from many high school graduates – with the expectation, of course, that theatrologists who have been prevented from doing so will happily become IT technicians. , pharmacists and plant mechanics.

This is obviously less tedious than doing what a community striving for social cohesion should do: caring for the educational precariat. Among people aged 25 to 35 in Germany, as much as 9 percent. (without migration origin) or 31 percent. (with migration origin) does not have the so-called professional qualifications.

University graduates earn € 860,000 more during their working lives than qualified employees

The desire to fill the training gap in general, and the craft gap in particular in advance, so to speak, with high school graduates, is simply: more convenient.

It didn’t help anyone. In any case, not those concerned – according to the Institute for Labor Market and Occupation Research, university graduates earn on average € 860,000 more during their working lives than skilled workers with vocational qualifications.

The damage would also be great for society as a whole. After all, the level of wages in an economy depends on the average productivity of its employees – and this largely depends on the level of education of its employees. Allowing a demotion here, and even wanting to force it, in itself and in the long run, would also lower wages at the top of the income scale.

After all, everyone loses except arrogance.

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